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Sequachee Valley safety demo trailer

Sequachee Valley Electric Cooperative recently completed their Live Line Safety demonstration trailer.

“We have already hosted a few safety demonstrations for volunteer fire departments, two for CRC co-op camp in Dunlap and a contractor’s meeting hosted by Lowe’s,” says SVEC’s Shelby Potterfield.

The trailer was built by district operations manager Jarvis Wooten and line foreman Dean Cartwright. In the photo, Dean Cartwright shows a group of volunteer fire fighters from Dunlap the importance of a lineman’s personal protective equipment.

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Summer Safety Tips

When the weather gets hot, we head outdoors for sun and fun. Keep in mind some tips from the Electrical Safety Foundation International to make sure everyone has a safe summer.

Water and electricity don’t mix

Summer is the season for swimming and boating, and awareness of electrical hazards around water can prevent deaths and injuries. Water and electricity don’t mix.

  • Sailboats often have masts of 30 feet or more, which are dangerous when they come into contact with overhead power lines. Look up as you get close to shore, and stay at least 10 feet away from overhead lines. Coming into contact with an energized power line causes serious and sometimes lethal electric shock.
  • Use covers on outdoor power outlets, especially near swimming pools. Keep cords and electrical devices away from the water, and never handle electrical items before you’ve dried off.
  • Use a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) to help prevent electrocutions and electrical shock injuries. These devices interrupt the flow of power when they sense a surge. Portable GFCIs require no tools to install and are available at prices ranging from $12 to $30.

 Lightning and storms

Lightning strikes are fatal in 10 percent of victims, and 70 percent suffer serious long-term effects, according to the National Weather Service. Because lightning can travel sideways for up to 10 miles, blue skies are not a sign of safety. If you hear thunder, take cover.

  • If weather conditions indicate a storm, stay inside—away from doors and windows—or seek shelter in a low-lying area away from trees and any metal, including sheds, clotheslines, poles, and fences. If you’re near water, stay as far away as possible.
  • If you’re in a group, spread out—don’t stand close together.
  • Indoors, unplug electronics before the storm arrives, and don’t use corded phones.
  • Avoid plumbing—sinks, bathtubs, faucets.
  • Don’t forget about your pets. Doghouses are not safe from lightning, and chained animals are easy targets.
  • If your home is flooded during a storm, don’t turn on appliances or electronics until given the okay by an electrician. If there’s laying water, don’t go inside. The water could be energized.

 Working with large appliances

If your air conditioner goes out, keep a few things in mind before you start poking around. Large appliances, such as air conditioners, are responsible for almost 20 percent of consumer-product electrocutions each year.

  • Understand your electrical system—know which fuse or circuit breaker controls each switch, light, and outlet.
  • Make sure circuits are turned off before starting work and take measures to ensure they’re not turned back on while working.
  • Use a circuit tester—always test before you touch.

Find more safety tips at esfi.org.

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Safety & Loss Control Instructor – MS

Electric Power Associations of Mississippi

Ridgeland, MS

Job Description

 

      Job Title:            Safety and Loss Control Instructor

Department:            Safety and Loss Control

 Reports To:            Vice President, Safety and Loss Control

            Date:            March 1, 2012

 

SUMMARY

 

Administers monthly safety and loss control meetings to all Electric Power Associations in Mississippi. Participates in schools, seminars and other functions as needed. Helps implement the Emergency Work Plan during times of disaster. Responsible for the planning, development and implementation of safety and training programs.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPOSIBILITIES include the following. Other duties may be assigned.

Plan, write, organize and teach electric distribution subjects and regulatory compliance to Electric Power Association personnel.

Must be a good communicator and have excellent speaking skills to work with both small and large audiences.

Willing to assist, supervise or train at lineman schools, seminars and other functions as needed by the Association and/or Vice President, Safety and Loss Control.

Conduct safety audits on Electric Power Association crews and facilities and report results to proper personnel.

Must be available to provide disaster assistance to the Associations and be willing to assist in system restoration.

Must be able to provide safety and loss control guidance to system employees that will maximize a safer work environment, compliance and education.

EDUCATION and/or EXPERIENCE

Must possess a minimum of a high school diploma and have a minimum of four years experience with an electric utility, preferably line construction and maintenance.

Must have experience and knowledge of powerline construction including RUS, NESC, OSHA, DOT and EPA regulations

Possessing the qualification or willing to earn the qualification of Certified Safety Professional (CSP), or the NRECA Certified Loss Control Professional (CLCP), is highly desired.

Computer skills, especially in Microsoft PowerPoint, Word and Outlook, is highly recommended.

WORKING CONDITIONS

Work is both inside and outside the Associations. Some irregular hours including night, weekends and holidays may be required.

Extensive travel within the state of Mississippi and limited out of state travel.

Must reside within reasonable commuting distance to the EPA office in Ridgeland.

SALARY

$50K – $65K. Salary to be determined by work related experience, education and pre-qualifications.

CONTACT

Micheal Weltzheimer, CLCP

Assistant to the Vice President, Safety and Loss Control

Electric Power Associations of Mississippi

P.O. Box 3300 – Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Fax: (601) 605-8601

weltzheimer@epaofms.com

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Space Heater Safety

NASHVILLE – Tennessee residents are experiencing the first real taste of winter this week, and Tennessee’s electric cooperatives remind homeowners that space heaters can be dangerous when not used properly.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, half of all home-heating fires occur in December, January and February, and heating equipment fires account for 18 percent of all reported home fires and 22 percent of home fire deaths.

Here are a few tips to remember when using space heaters:

  • Be certain that space heaters at least 3 feet away from curtains, furniture and other household items.
  • Select a heater that has been certified by a recognized testing group like Underwriters Laboratories.
  • Do not allow children or pets to play near space heaters.

You can learn more about space heater safety from the National Fire Protection Association.

The Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association is a trade group representing the interests of Tennessee’s 23 electric distribution cooperatives and the 1.1 million consumers they serve.